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Tim Harris    
   

 

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Bio

TIM HARRIS, HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE
DIRECTOR APPLIED PHYSICS & INSTRUMENTATION GROUP

Tim Harris is a Group Leader and Director of Applied Physics at the HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus in Ashburn, VA. After receiving his Ph.D. from Purdue University, Tim spent the following 18 very collaborative years at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ. While at Bell, his work included high sensitivity fluorescence, the first use of CCD imagers for Raman scattering instrumentation, the characterization of quantum dots using a variety of spectroscopic tool, the first report of fluorescence Near-Field Microscopy. The latter led to many follow on applications including single molecule imaging, lifetimes, and spectroscopy, single quantum dot imaging and spectroscopy. In 1996 Harris moved to Seq Ltd. a small biotech startup in Princeton, NJ, where he led the development of high throughput multicolor confocal microscopy for cell based drug screening. The imager was deployed to pharmaceutical labs around the world. Harris moved to Helicos Biosciences in January 2004 as the founding technical employee where his team reported the first single molecule DNA sequencing. He has held his current position since 2008. His group is charged with development of tools to advance the current state of neuroscience research. Projects included characterization of new fluorescence probes for two photon microscopy, development of specialized microscopes for synapse resolved neuro-anatomy, and projects for advanced electrophysiology using both extracellular and patch pipette technology.

 

 

Presentation abstract

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCED MICROELECTRONICS IN RESEARCH AND CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE

Neuroscience Research has moved to the forefront of activity in many organizations. Examples are the US BRAIN Initiative, Allen Institute for Brain Research, Champalimaud Centre, Sainsbury-Wellcome Center at UCL, and the HHMI Janelia Research Center. Devices for recording electrical neuronal signals and stimulating neurons, cameras for imaging activity, and neuroprosthetic devices for motor movement and sensory input are all limited by the electronics performance currently deployed. I will discuss the next generation recording devices currently under development at IMEC as well as several other opportunities for advanced electronics in neuroscience.

 

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