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Johan Driesen    
   

 

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Bio

JOHAN DRIESEN, KU LEUVEN / ENERGYVILLE
PROFESSOR

Johan Driesen received the MSc degree in 1996 as Electrical Engineer from the KU Leuven, Belgium. He received the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at KU Leuven in 2000. In 2000-2001 he was a visiting researcher in the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, UK. In 2002 he was working at the University of California, Berkeley, USA. Currently he is a full professor at the KU Leuven and teaches power electronics, renewables, drives and electromobility. He conducts research on distributed energy resources, including renewable energy systems, power electronics and its applications, for instance in renewable energy and electric vehicles.

Within Belgium, Johan Driesen is co-director of the KU Leuven Energy Institute, and within EnergyVille, the research collaboration in Genk specializing in energy in smart cities and buildings, in cooperation with VITO and imec, he leads the programmes on power electronics, distributed energy resources, electric vehicles and storage interfaces.

Johan Driesen is also the programme director of the international master programmes in energy at KU Leuven and within the EIT-KIC InnoEnergy, a pan-European consortium supporting education and innovation in sustainable energy, the Education Director for the Benelux area.

 

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Presentation abstract

RATIONALE FOR AND POWER ELECTRONIC BUILDING BLOCKS  OF DC NANOGRIDS

Within buildings, most energy-efficient electrical appliances are power electronic based, for instance LED-lighting, controlled drives in heat pumps and white goods, IT-equipment and soon electrical vehicle chargers. At the same time, the typical “house-compatible” electricity sources, being photovoltaics (PV), is in principle DC, similar to battery-based storage systems required to help with achieve the local energy balance. As PV is developing further as BIPV, the issue should be raised whether it is not time to question the legacy-based practice of provide a radial AC low-voltage 50/60 Hz grid as a standard inside buildings. New insights lead to the conclusion that a local DC network is more viable to interconnect the electrical appliances, storage and sources, but still there are a lot of technology choices to be made in relation to this disruptive technology switch. This presentation discusses the power electronics “DC nanogrid building blocks” that are necessary to make the local electricity grid of the future work in a sustainable, reliable and affordable way.

 

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